Wednesday, August 17, 2011


Name: Sage (Salvia officinalis)

*One of the best known culinary herbs
*An evergreen plant: leaves can be taken all year long if covered with a frost cloth in the winter
*best in zones 4-8
*there are many fun flavors of sage today, including pineapple sage, honey melon sage, and peach sage
*a moth repellent: place the dried herb in moth places

Parts Used:
*leaves and flowers, fresh or dried

*full sun
*well drained soil
*it does not make a good indoor plant
*it can be happy in containers (esp. pineapple sage)

*Sage can be propagated by seed. Use the cold stratification technique before planting seeds for best results
*Sage can be propagated by tip cuttings or division as well

Pineapple Sage
*gentle pruning or pinching back, esp. after flowering, helps plant
*do not heavily fertilize this plant
*if you have sudden wilting, it is likely that there is poor drainage and thus root rot
*avoid pruning in the fall
*the plant becomes woody after 4-5 years and should be replanted

*harvest fresh leaves and flowers for culinary use at any time
*dry leaves and sprigs before flowering by spreading them out in a well-aired place, then store in an airtight container
*the aroma/flavor of sage intensifies if it is dried
*drying can be difficult if done improperly: it becomes a horrible tasting, musty leaf: if in doubt, use it fresh

*it is an anti-inflammatory remedy
*if used as a mouthwash and gargle, it is good for sore throats and mouth infections
*it has a drying effect on excessive sweating and is a popular herb to treat night sweats associated with menopause
*it has a beneficial effect on the mind by improving memory, concentration, and mood
*it gives vitality after long illnesses
*it is good for the digestion when used in cooking foods

*it goes well with starchy, rich foods such as duck, poultry, pork, red meats, beans, eggplant, tomato-based sauces, casseroles, soups, and stuffing

For more information, see: references and warnings

Saliva officinalis

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