Tuesday, July 26, 2011


*Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

*an annual plant
*looks good in ground or in containers, though not a big fan of hanging baskets

Parts Used:

*Full to part sun
*fertile, well-drained soil

*grow from seed
*In the fall, you can begin the seeds by sowing them in pots/trays in half compost and half standard potting soil. After frost dangers are past, you can then plant them in the spring
*You can also directly sow the seed into your garden in the spring

*If you deadhead the old flowers, the flowering season will be longer
*This is a very hardy plant but it is sensitive to getting too much water
*This plant is prone to mildew, spider mite, slugs, and black flies

*Gather the petals after the morning dew has dried, spread them out on racks/cookie sheets, and out of direct sunlight, in a well-ventilated place. When dried, store in an airtight container.

*The petals possess wound healing and anti-inflammatory properties. To help wounds, cuts, and burns, apply topically in the form of an ointment or infused oil (instructions coming soon!)  It helps by slowing the bleeding and keeping the site free of infection.
*If used in a tincture form (instructions coming soon!), it can be used as a mouthwash against mouth sores
*It can also be taken internally for infection/inflammations of the gut and for stomach ulcers
*Overall: for cell repair, infection/injuries, bruises, burns, fevers, indigestion, diarrhea, hair, and skin

For additional information, see: references and warnings

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